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Dioramas: Flora & Fauna
Trees, shrubs, nature and animals.
Hosted by Darren Baker
cattails
dioman13
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Indiana, United States
Member Since: August 19, 2007
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Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 09:03 AM UTC
does anyone know if cattail plant are a European plant also? If not then want local type would be present. Thanks.
1969
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England - East Midlands, United Kingdom
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Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 09:25 AM UTC
Do you mean the ones that grow in and around water,long stem with brown cigar like end?if so yes they grow in europe.

Steve
FAUST
#130
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Noord-Holland, Netherlands
Member Since: June 07, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 10:09 AM UTC
Ola Bob

If you are reffering to the Cattail as in Lythrum Salicaria Yes it is found in Europe. In Holland it goes by the litteral translation of "Kattenstaart" and looks like this


If you are reffering to the Cattail as the type of reed with the cigar end it is found in Europe too. Latin Name Typha Latifolia and in Holland know as the "Lisdodde" or... the name actually everybody knows in Holland... "Rietsigaar" which is litterally translated to Reedcigar
dioman13
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Indiana, United States
Member Since: August 19, 2007
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Posted: Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 08:57 AM UTC
thanks to all the answers guys. saves alot of headachs if I was wrong.
milvehfan
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North Carolina, United States
Member Since: June 26, 2007
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Posted: Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 09:50 AM UTC
BOB, I was reading through SOLDAT #6512, by Concord Publishing and on page 31 there is a picture of German Troops moving through a forested swampland west of Leingrad. The area seems a bit trampled up but on the right side of the photo about 1/3 of the way down there appears to be two cattails visable....BUT who knows my eyesight is not what it used to be Good luck with your reshearch and Happy Modeling.
rchristenson
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Alberta, Canada
Member Since: June 13, 2008
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2008 - 05:17 PM UTC
just as a side note, the roots of the cigar-ended "cat tail, as well as the young shoots are edible and tasty!
whittman181
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Massachusetts, United States
Member Since: December 30, 2006
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2008 - 05:38 PM UTC
Do they taste like chicken sorry , just something we say around my neck of the woods Bob
spaarndammer
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Noord-Holland, Netherlands
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2008 - 09:42 PM UTC

Quoted Text


If you are reffering to the Cattail as the type of reed with the cigar end it is found in Europe too. Latin Name Typha Latifolia and in Holland know as the "Lisdodde" or... the name actually everybody knows in Holland... "Rietsigaar" which is litterally translated to Reedcigar



We used to dry the 'sigars' and used them as 'real' sigars when I was a kid. So we actually lit them them and then they started to smoke. The smell of the smoke and the sigar is really nice. I guess they are nowadays a protected species.



Jelger
Grumpyoldman
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Florida, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 - 02:18 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


If you are reffering to the Cattail as the type of reed with the cigar end it is found in Europe too. Latin Name Typha Latifolia and in Holland know as the "Lisdodde" or... the name actually everybody knows in Holland... "Rietsigaar" which is litterally translated to Reedcigar



We used to dry the 'sigars' and used them as 'real' sigars when I was a kid. So we actually lit them them and then they started to smoke. The smell of the smoke and the sigar is really nice. I guess they are nowadays a protected species.



Jelger



We did that to, along with dried grape vines.
Good to know the roots are edible, the next time I'm lost in the swamp, I won't starve looking for frog legs.
We also used them when we were younger to ward off the pesky bugs, seems the bugs didn't like the smoke, especially mosquitoes.
keenan
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Indiana, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 - 02:35 AM UTC
Yeah Dave when we were kids we would soak them in kerosene and burn them. Poor man's Tiki torches.


Quoted Text

I guess they are nowadays a protected species.


Wow. They are everywhere in Central Indiana. You guys need some?

Shaun
Bratushka
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Indiana, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 - 02:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text


We also used them when we were younger to ward off the pesky bugs, seems the bugs didn't like the smoke, especially mosquitoes.



i remember those from when i was a kid. i think they were called "punks" and looked like a fat brown incense stick. had a real sweet, woody odor when burning.