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The Death of Fury

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Giang Xuan Le, owner, sculptor and painter of Paracel Miniatures, shares his latest 1/35 scale World War II diorama - The Death of Fury.


Sherman is M4A3E8 Easy Eight from Tamiya. Figures are from Paracel - World War II series, Alpine and Stalingrad. Horse is modified from a Dragon Models kit.

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About the Author

About


Comments

amazing... i dont recall about the horse....
MAY 26, 2018 - 08:31 AM
The horse is probably an allegory of death from the Book of Revelation, chapter 6,verse 8: "And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him."
MAY 27, 2018 - 02:11 AM
That is an amazingly well done piece. You can feel the gravity of the moment when you look at it. Even if you've never seen the movie you can sense the chaos that had to precede that time. Absolutely fantastic work. Jim LSA
JUN 03, 2018 - 07:43 AM
Absolutely amazing work. Everything comes together so well, the figures, the weathering, the composition. If my skills were anywhere close to that, I would probably add damages to the stowage.
JUN 03, 2018 - 09:45 PM
great job !!!
JUN 08, 2018 - 11:48 PM
This is absolutely, very, very incredible masterpiece, man... Even I don't think that you will put a dead jerry at the front hull. Every single aspects of the diorama are amazing. Really love the mud effect, dead Germans in the mud, mud spills in the lower-front hull, every GI's positioning, and... the sad story in it. Congratulations mate and can't wait to see your another excellence. I think this diorama is "Best job you ever had" Best regards from Indonesia Garry
JUN 10, 2018 - 02:53 AM
Excellent craftsmanship. The figures are well done. But I guess I will be the "lone dissenting voice" here. Where did the body of the tanker come from since all the hatches are closed up tighter than the proverbial drum? I didn't really care much for the movie, and don't really like dioramas showing this much fictional human destruction, but I have to admit this one is well done, except for the logic of the hatches being closed. The inclusion of the "pale horse" is also very "poetic" and a nice touch, however, wouldn't it have been better if it was bridled and being held by a soldier, ready to receive the body perhaps? Most horses can sense danger and will shy away from destruction, so it's not realistic one would just be "standing by" without some "coercion". Other than these comments, it's an excellent depiction of the "real cost of war". VR, Russ
JUN 10, 2018 - 03:29 AM
As for the hatches, maybe he was the last one to get out so they've closed the hatches and as the battle has passed, there is nothing left there to frighten the horse
JUN 10, 2018 - 06:54 AM
Well, here's the thing-- those two turret hatches are spring loaded, which means without the dog on the inside of the hatch being dogged down, they would be sprung up slightly. Generally when a tanker "unbuttons" to secure the tank, all but one of the hatches is "dogged down" from the inside, and a latch is attached (usually with a lock) to either the commander or loaders hatch, which is then locked to keep it closed. I don't see any of that on this vehicle. Also, most domesticated horses will actually shy away from the smell of blood, or the movement of strangers in battle gear. I'm not picking at the artistry of the model here, it just seems to be these two minor points "hang there" in "the story". VR, Russ
JUN 10, 2018 - 04:31 PM
Fair point. I suppose considering the battle the tank's just been through those springs aren't exactly going to be in mint condition, and putting the horse right next to the tank certainly cuts down on overall base size.
JUN 11, 2018 - 08:14 AM
We broke our quick reply box. Working on it. Until fixed go to topic to reply.
Thanks.