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Shipwreck! S.S. 'Lucky'

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Sean Hadfield [Windysean] has shared his kitbashing and scratchbuilding skills with us before and now we see his latest creation - a shipwreck next to a railroad bridge.
HO Scenery: Shipwreck
Sean shares this media magnet model that was featured in television coverage of the Mad City Model Train Show. Sean narrates his process thusly;
    To cut the hull on an odd slant, I sighted across a straightedge and marked dots on the hull along my sight-line. Then I wrestled with a hacksaw while maintaining the line of the markings.

    Ideally, I would have mounted it to a scrap wood block at the desired angle and then run it through a band saw.

    Posts and Lots of Pieces
    Just tune out the world and keep measuring, cutting, and adding little styrene items. The 1/87 scale sailor helps me determine sizes. The 1/108 scale kit lends partsó search light, navigation markers, and bits. The wheelhouse roof is not glued, so I can paint black inside and add windows after painting.

    Primed
    Light gray, faded, patchy prime coat, dusted white overall. The very heavy paint is cracking and pulling better than I hoped.
Sean painted the model with craft paints thinned with alcohol. He continues the natrrative:
    Masking
    The name decals from the kit, ironically named "Lucky", were white, so I needed to paint a dark background for them.

    Finishing
    For the broken glass, I cut random triangles and sharp shapes from clear styrene. Then, I laid a bead of tacky craft glue around the inside of the window openings and randomly placed pieces in it.

    The awning was a lesson in itself. I fit and cut a pattern from scrap paper, then traced onto facial tissue. I brushed on diluted white glue, but to my surprise, it expanded in size, so I fit it back in place on the frame to dry. When it was dried, I removed it and cut it to size again with scissors.

    Then, off the boat, I brushed on a thin coat of white craft paint. Using the stencil in the photo, made from a business card, I dry-brushed on the blue stripes. The final awning was glued down with Aleene's Tacky Craft Glue. For the tears, I re-wet the white glue and used a hobby knife to slash it, then poked the sagging parts with a toothpick until it hung down correctly.

    Completed
    The paint looked too dark, so I dry-brushed more white above and red below, and it brightened up nicely. The moldy green was heart-stopping for me, because it was so bold. Until then, I had been using only subdued colors.

    Final
    It looked unbalanced without the bow mast (bowspirit?), so I extended a piece of clear plastic to the center front, and mounted another mast, painted, and strung.
Sean's shipwreck may be a wreck but it is a unique creation that is an eye-catcher along the railway.
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About the Author

About Sean Hadfield (windysean)
FROM: WISCONSIN, UNITED STATES

I picked up model building and HO-scale model trains from my father. I've been working at it now for more than 45 years, always learning more. Although a self-proclaimed cheapskate, I always modify or add to my builds to make them unique and special (for better or worse, ha ha).