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Dioramas
Do you love dioramas & vignettes? We sure do.
Moving into the manly scale of 1/16
jrutman
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Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 - 08:13 AM UTC
Weekend update for you sports fans. Added more putty to the front,some PE and began fleshing out the back as well.





I have to whittle down the opening for the neck a bit after adding the scarf. The head is too far to the left now.
After the back is wrapped up th last major area will be his left arm.
J
jrutman
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Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 - 01:29 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Oops! Grandmothers and sucking eggs spring to mind! As I said, I wasn't complaining, just pointing that detail out for the others. You did say you were using a wartime photo to follow. I've seen plenty of photos of German gear not being worn properly or extemporised (e.g. helmet covers made from a flat piece of fabric and held on with bits of string or pieces cut from inner tubes). As you point out not every German soldier even in the SS was a stickler for regulations - the SS in particular liked to sew their badges onto camo clothing in defiance of regulations and even where it compromised concealment.






Yep yep,no problemo here.
There is only one hard rule about German stuff in WWII=there is NO hard rule.
J
Hohenstaufen
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Posted: Friday, November 09, 2018 - 05:54 AM UTC
Oops! Grandmothers and sucking eggs spring to mind! As I said, I wasn't complaining, just pointing that detail out for the others. You did say you were using a wartime photo to follow. I've seen plenty of photos of German gear not being worn properly or extemporised (e.g. helmet covers made from a flat piece of fabric and held on with bits of string or pieces cut from inner tubes). As you point out not every German soldier even in the SS was a stickler for regulations - the SS in particular liked to sew their badges onto camo clothing in defiance of regulations and even where it compromised concealment.
jrutman
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Posted: Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 04:47 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Not a criticsm, just an observation -the prototype of this guy was either a slob or his helmet cover got ripped, because the way it fitted was a sewn-in lip at the front which slipped over the front peak of the helmet, then the cover was held in place by three steel sprung clips, one at each side and one at the rear (there are prominent sleeves in the cover for the springs). So either the lip got ripped off, or had possibly frayed on the sharp edge of the M42 helmet, or he couldn't be bothered to put it on properly!



Thank you yes,I am abundantly aware of the construction of these helmet covers. I have a 2 volume tomb filled with color pics of authentic articles of German WSS cammo uniform items that stands about half a foot thick when laid flat. The summer side of this cover barely shows the side panels covering the spring. The cover is sewn onto the inside,or winter/fall side of the cover. I have plenty of pics showing the cover slipped off the front of the helmet by pushing the chinstrap up too many times or whatever reason,worn out,ripped,etc etc.
The prototype pic shows an actual soldier in combat and not a kriegsberichter photo op propaganda type guy. I have done my due diligence.
J
Hohenstaufen
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Posted: Tuesday, November 06, 2018 - 10:32 AM UTC
Not a criticsm, just an observation -the prototype of this guy was either a slob or his helmet cover got ripped, because the way it fitted was a sewn-in lip at the front which slipped over the front peak of the helmet, then the cover was held in place by three steel sprung clips, one at each side and one at the rear (there are prominent sleeves in the cover for the springs). So either the lip got ripped off, or had possibly frayed on the sharp edge of the M42 helmet, or he couldn't be bothered to put it on properly!
PolishBrigade12
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Posted: Sunday, November 04, 2018 - 04:41 AM UTC
Ruck On Bby! Yes Jerry, the eyes play tricks the younger we get, lol. My right eye has a habit of twitching right about the time I'm focusing on painting serious detail, so I wait, then try again. Problem being, the paint has already dried, HA! Frustrating, argggg....

Off to a great start Amigo. And like Tim said, the errors will be blaring right in your face, but it also gives the opportunity for more detail. Given your record of work I think you'll be ruckin right along. Bookmarked!


Cheers, Ski.
panamadan
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Posted: Sunday, November 04, 2018 - 04:35 AM UTC
I guess it depends on when you were there.
It has quite a small arms collection (especially Lugers) and you should see what they have in storage!
Dan
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, November 04, 2018 - 04:32 AM UTC

Quoted Text

nice helmet Jerry-just saw one of the yesterday at Camp Ripley's nice museum.
Dan


I was at Ripley 4 times. I never recall a museum. But then again,we weren't allowed to go anywhere.
J
panamadan
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Posted: Sunday, November 04, 2018 - 03:18 AM UTC
nice helmet Jerry-just saw one of the yesterday at Camp Ripley's nice museum.
Dan
panamadan
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Posted: Sunday, November 04, 2018 - 03:14 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I remember reading somewhere that the Germans were shocked by the condition of the British prisoners they took in 1940, particularly the state of their teeth. Some of the second line German divisions would have looked pretty similar though methinks, for example the "Ear and Stomach Battalions" and the reserve divisions made up from older men who had been on the job line in the 20s. Even through the 1930s Depression, the British Army still struggled to recruit, the army was still viewed as a last resort for the desperate. In 1939, it was still under establishment and the Territorial battalions were in even worse state.The difference was that the Nazis did introduce Social Services which were not available to the British until after WW2.



Believe it or not,us Americans also had a big problem because of the depression and folks getting proper nutrition. If you look at the pics from the late 30s and even guys lining up to get a physical for armed forces induction,there are lots of pale skinny guys in those lines.
A good part of early armed forces training was devoted to building up health,endurance and stamina through good food in reasonable amounts and lots of physical activity.
J


Found this Jerry-
https://books.google.com/books?id=ceXQCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA285&lpg=PA285&dq=us+army+wwii+pulling+teeth+draftees&source=bl&ots=2FHDtw7C7K&sig=b6ZtblhezJ3dNDt6aUL9x7twG7Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiu37HggrveAhUCW60KHa-SCqoQ6AEwE3oECAAQAQ#v=onepage&q=us%20army%20wwii%20pulling%20teeth%20draftees&f=false
I remember getting training about brushing teeth in basic!
Dan
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, November 04, 2018 - 02:30 AM UTC
Fred and Dave,
Thanks guys! Nice of you to comment.
Fred,you will have to contact his personal agent for rental details,sorry,
J
strongarden
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Posted: Friday, November 02, 2018 - 03:35 AM UTC
Absolutely brilliant Jerry, as always.
Watching for more man.

Regards
Dave
JPTRR
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RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Posted: Friday, November 02, 2018 - 03:26 AM UTC
Jerry,

Love your work. Inspired by it. Anxious to see progress. That 5 O'clock shade - brilliant!

When you are done, can I borrow him as a guard for my 1/16 Siegfried Railgun?
JPTRR
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RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Posted: Friday, November 02, 2018 - 03:22 AM UTC

Quoted Text

One of his brothers went into the Army, but was rejected because he "didn't weigh enough, even though he was 6ft tall-- he was accepted into the Navy though.



Hi Russ,

This reminds me of many examples I have read of famous USN, USMC, and USAAF pilots who were rejected for being underweight. Several instances when a Flight Surgeon told them go home and eat banana splits/milk shakes for a week/month. It worked for them. (Which, as an aside, makes me wonder about how many it did NOT work for - we'll never know because they never went on to be famous.)

Dad and his two friends joined USN in 1939. The friend he served with on USS Houston (who became a POW in March, 1942) told me the three of them joined their state Army National Guard while in high school, because it gave them reliable food. All three of them were boxers so I bet USN had no problem with their physical!
jrutman
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Posted: Friday, November 02, 2018 - 01:17 AM UTC
Tim and Ivanhoe!
Thanks for the kind words as always Gents,
Yes,bigger is scarier for detail freaks!On the other hand,you get the challenge of seeing how much more little things you can now get to show! LoL
here is my latest attempt.



Still a WIP though.
ivanhoe6
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Posted: Thursday, November 01, 2018 - 11:56 PM UTC
Yep, the camera doesn't lie. It's a great tool to find miscues.
The slipped cammo cover with a bit of the helmet peaking out is a great touch !
Keep us posted on your progress !
Dioramartin
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Posted: Thursday, November 01, 2018 - 10:39 PM UTC
Ouch 1/16 is Scary Scale because there’s nowhere to hide errors. Seeing as you pretty much painted fingerprints in 1/35 (that dirty palm-print recently) I’m expecting to see eyelashes & unwanted (as opposed to wanted) nasal hair in this one mate! Looking good, he’s breathing alright
jrutman
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Posted: Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 05:24 AM UTC
Kevlar,Ivanhoe and Sean,
Thanks for the observations Gents. Gives a good insite into the times we try to model after!

Sean,thanks for the kind words. I decided to go with the later style cover with foliage loops. Adds more interest maybe?
I am using a specific pic for ref here and a lot of the things on this guy will mimic that. The prototypes' cover has slipped off the front of his helmet so I added that tweek.
Here we go on the cover so far. Hideously enlarged so I can pick up my errors,






Goin' for the scuffed cloth look. Still will add some dirt and dust effects.
Have a look-see.
J
Sean50
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Posted: Monday, October 29, 2018 - 07:09 AM UTC

Quoted Text



What is the consensus on the helmet cover? Late style with foliage loops or early without?
J



Hello Jerry

What's the rest of his uniform going to be?
I see you've gone for the later model.
I do like the fact that it's not fitted properly, another nicely observed detail.
And his pose is again nigh-on perfect.

Cheers

Sean
ivanhoe6
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Posted: Monday, October 29, 2018 - 07:05 AM UTC
To get off the farm at16 my father lied about his age in 1938 and enlisted in the army. He said that was the first time he ever saw a dentist. Gosh, now it's twice a year for some folks.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 10:36 AM UTC
Just a side note, my father and two of his older brothers enlisted on December 8th 1941. One of his brothers went into the Army, but was rejected because he "didn't weigh enough, even though he was 6ft tall-- he was accepted into the Navy though. My Dad and his other brother joined the Navy right off, and by December 31st, 1942 my dad had been assigned to the USS Essex, an aircraft carrier, and had gained 20lbs, despite having 4 teeth pulled during his induction physical. That was the only dental care he had ever received in his life before that time. By the end of the war, Dad had been fitted for dentures, because the Navy dentists at that time had been told to just pull teeth rather than engage in any lengthy and expensive dental treatments like crowns or extensive fillings-- it was cheaper to just pass out new teeth! Looking forward to see how you're going to depict these German teeth!
VR, Russ
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 04:10 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I remember reading somewhere that the Germans were shocked by the condition of the British prisoners they took in 1940, particularly the state of their teeth. Some of the second line German divisions would have looked pretty similar though methinks, for example the "Ear and Stomach Battalions" and the reserve divisions made up from older men who had been on the job line in the 20s. Even through the 1930s Depression, the British Army still struggled to recruit, the army was still viewed as a last resort for the desperate. In 1939, it was still under establishment and the Territorial battalions were in even worse state.The difference was that the Nazis did introduce Social Services which were not available to the British until after WW2.



Believe it or not,us Americans also had a big problem because of the depression and folks getting proper nutrition. If you look at the pics from the late 30s and even guys lining up to get a physical for armed forces induction,there are lots of pale skinny guys in those lines.
A good part of early armed forces training was devoted to building up health,endurance and stamina through good food in reasonable amounts and lots of physical activity.
J
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 04:07 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Spilling popcorn onto my lap!🍿… Really enjoying the show thus far!

—mike




Thanks Mikey!
I always appreciate your comments buddy,
J
Hohenstaufen
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Posted: Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 10:18 AM UTC
I remember reading somewhere that the Germans were shocked by the condition of the British prisoners they took in 1940, particularly the state of their teeth. Some of the second line German divisions would have looked pretty similar though methinks, for example the "Ear and Stomach Battalions" and the reserve divisions made up from older men who had been on the job line in the 20s. Even through the 1930s Depression, the British Army still struggled to recruit, the army was still viewed as a last resort for the desperate. In 1939, it was still under establishment and the Territorial battalions were in even worse state.The difference was that the Nazis did introduce Social Services which were not available to the British until after WW2.
justsendit
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Posted: Friday, October 26, 2018 - 07:05 AM UTC
Spilling popcorn onto my lap!🍿… Really enjoying the show thus far!

—mike