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Painting: Painting with Acrylic
Discuss Acrylic painting techniques.
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How to paint Native American flesh tone
Wolf-Leader
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New Hampshire, United States
Member Since: June 06, 2002
entire network: 1,142 Posts
KitMaker Network: 428 Posts
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 - 11:36 AM UTC
Hi everyone,
I just bought a bust of a native american and would like to know how to paint flesh tones.
Also,I use Jo Sonja acrylic paints,so if anyone out there uses this brand please feel free to tell me what the colors would be to paint this bust.
Thank you.
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Member Since: January 01, 2004
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Posted: Tuesday, October 02, 2018 - 11:06 AM UTC
No simple answers. I live not far from a Mohawk Res and some Natives can be Caucasian light, and at the other extreme, some are as dark as South-East Asians (Cambodians, Thais, and Malasians).
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Member Since: March 15, 2009
entire network: 2,132 Posts
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Posted: Tuesday, October 02, 2018 - 11:32 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi everyone,
I just bought a bust of a native american and would like to know how to paint flesh tones.
Also,I use Jo Sonja acrylic paints,so if anyone out there uses this brand please feel free to tell me what the colors would be to paint this bust.
Thank you.



I've done a few of the old Series 77 "Native American" figures in 120mm--primarily Sioux and Blackfoot. I started with a "flesh base" color, then added red brown and brown paint until I had a good shade for the base. Then, for areas under the eyes, nose and creases along the nose I would add just a small drop of insignia blue to the mixture, you heard right--blue will darken the paint enough that it will give a little "shading" effect. For the "highlights" around the eyes, eyebrows cheekbones and temples, add a little white and "lemon" yellow into the mix (not bright yellow-- but a little softer "pastel" shade). Native American faces range from a ruddy "hull" red to a dark brownish-red for the most part, but they can be lighter. "Red" is really not an apt description of the color either, you should be looking for a base shade ranging from a dark pinkish to a light burgundy color, with a twinge of brown. Using today's Native Americans as an example might be OK, but if the subject is from the early 18th or 19th centuries, remember there were far less Caucasian genes in the pool, so to speak. I recommend you start with a cheap pallet, and mix your colors to suit before you apply them to the figure--figure out what looks good-- and wait for it to dry as shades will usually darken as they dry--keep track of your mixtures either on the pallet (if you are using a disposable pallet), or on a handy piece of paper. Also take a look at some artist renditions of Native Americans, that helped me a lot. Hope this helps.
VR, Russ