login   |    register
Campaigns: Active Campaigns
Campaigns that are either in planning or underway should be grouped here.
Hosted by John Pereira
6-Day War Campaign - SH'OT
Neill
Visit this Community
California, United States
Member Since: May 26, 2003
entire network: 1,232 Posts
KitMaker Network: 67 Posts
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 05:32 AM UTC
School starts in a month so I am BACK with a new model for display in my classroom as part of the 6-Day War %0 Year Anniversary Campaign 1/25 Centurion renamed "Sh'ot" or Scourge in Israel.

In my June Trip to Israel, I saw lots of Mk III converted to APC, but as this is the 50th Year Jubilee for the 6-Day War, I am focused on that era. Lots of version and even some IDF ones, but I need it to be larger scale so Tamyia old 1/25 Centurion is the base.

Not building interior as I always loved Shep Paine's words: Never put time and energy into what they will not see."

Minor Modifications to make it 1967 Israeli, but must decide on the gun . . . While in Israel in June, i did some research, saw a few originals. So according to that research some of the Sh'ot when into battle with the old 20 pounder and some with the up-graded gun. By 1973 all were upgraded. Still thinking on that one.

Basic chassis, but plan to leave just one rear dust skirt off to show drive and road wheels assembly - kinda nice on this old model.

AS anyone who has had to paint one of these beasts real time knows, we never cover the rubier part of the road wheel. In a few miles it is chipping and wearing off. Tried to capture that wear and chipped effect with the salt chipping technique.

Black base coat, Brit version of olive green, dullcote to seal, then paint brushed on water at key points, cover in salr ( used sea salt this time) and spray of the Israeli "sand" scheme

To work the rubber area I did mask the inner road wheel to protect the base color - Frog painters tape (Like BLue, but green) cut out area away exposing rubber wheel - paint, chip mess with it. Once basic built and paint done I will weather . . .