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Dioramas: Vietnam
For Vietnam diorama subjects or techniques.
Hosted by Darren Baker
"Frag Out!" Vientam 1967
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 - 12:26 PM GMT+7
Here is my latest figure vignette. It depicts an Infantryman warning his buddies that he is about to throw a fragmentary grenade at the enemy by calling out "FRAG OUT!". The area had been prepped by airstrikes and artillery hence the burnt trees and ash on the ground. The figure is a conversion of several Bravo 6 figures with a Hornet head. Note the pull ring from the grenade on a finger of his left hand.







































If anyone has any questions, I'd be happy to answer them.

Cheers,
James
obg153
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Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 - 12:38 PM GMT+7
Really cool! Even though its' a lone figure, you can still sense the tension in the scene. Very nice work!!
cdharwins
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Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 - 02:24 PM GMT+7
Another fine job, James!

Chris
Trisaw
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Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 - 02:34 PM GMT+7
Nice figure conversion! The uniform and jungle colors make the figure look like he's wet from the rains. The pose looks so natural and dynamic.
Maki
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ARMORAMA
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Croatia Hrvatska
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Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 - 05:33 PM GMT+7
Wow, the details on the equipment are just unbeleavable... One of the best Vietnam War figures I have seen in a while, the attention to details is amazing.

Well done!
Mario
jrutman
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Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 01:55 AM GMT+7
Another masterpiece from the Vietwar!! You are the past master at this era buddy! I always admire your painting style and the colors are so spot on for this time period.
Not too sure about the naked canteens though. Maybe a hint of too much yellow?
My favorite first sgt from my first unit I was assigned to told me once about his respect for the VC or the NVA regulars. He said the most impressive thing he ever saw was after an arc light went through the assault area,and he saw how devastating that was,as soon as the smoke cleared he heard the pop pop pop of small arms from the enemy that had survived. They NEVER gave up.
J
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MODELGEEK
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Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 03:06 AM GMT+7
Outstanding work, truly a work of art
Demchenko
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BRAVO-6
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Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 05:30 AM GMT+7
James, amazing job as usually! Figure looks nice, but also I`d like to note interesting base idea with burnt trunk, it gives interesting visual contrast with figure.
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 07:52 AM GMT+7
Thanks, everyone. I am glad you like the figure.

Jerry, you are right about the uncovered canteen color. It does seem too bright. I should have compared them to an actual canteen, which I have a buttload of but not where I was at when I was painting this. I also think I might have left out one of the colors I usually add to the mix for the canteen colors. After reading your post I went through my stash of Vietnam gear and grabbed a canteen to colormatch. I gave the canteens a few washes of Reaper Olive Drab and I think they are better now. Thanks to you and Shawn Gehling for pointing that out. I am going to be displaying this at the Tulsa Figure Show and Soonercon next month, so I am glad that I could post this to get feedback prior to the show in order to make any necessary corrections. Also, the intent of the burnt up terrain that one would think nothing could live through is also illustrative of the point your First Sergeant told you about - the NVA and VC were tough and never quit and a smart Soldier respects that.

Here are photos of the fixed canteen colors.














Cheers,
James
trickymissfit
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Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 02:52 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Another masterpiece from the Vietwar!! You are the past master at this era buddy! I always admire your painting style and the colors are so spot on for this time period.
Not too sure about the naked canteens though. Maybe a hint of too much yellow?
My favorite first sgt from my first unit I was assigned to told me once about his respect for the VC or the NVA regulars. He said the most impressive thing he ever saw was after an arc light went through the assault area,and he saw how devastating that was,as soon as the smoke cleared he heard the pop pop pop of small arms from the enemy that had survived. They NEVER gave up.
J



The towel is a nice touch, but also the wrong color. Virtually every one used was O.D. green. M16 is a forward assist version. They didn't show up till Tet in 68, Also you didn't go a hundred feet past the wire without a combat load out. (21 mags and at least two belts) Still a nice piece of work.

gary
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 01:16 AM GMT+7
Yep,the new color looks spot on to me now. This is a great piece as always!
J
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 04:25 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text



The towel is a nice touch, but also the wrong color. Virtually every one used was O.D. green. M16 is a forward assist version. They didn't show up till Tet in 68, Also you didn't go a hundred feet past the wire without a combat load out. (21 mags and at least two belts) Still a nice piece of work.

gary



Thanks for your feedback, Gary. It is much appreciated and you can't beat getting info from those who were there. Thanks for your service. Prior to embarking on about 95% of my projects I talk to Veterans of the unit I am portraying who were involved in the events depicted in the project. Because of the wide range and differences of one's experiences in Vietnam depending on time frame, area of the country, and unit, I feel it is important so I can try to get as many of the smaller details correct in order to honor their service. Most of my work has depicted 9th Infantry Division units since that is the unit my father served in while in Vietnam and I have the most access to many Veterans from various 9th Infantry Division units who have helped me with details such as Bill Rambow helping me with the details for my "Breakfast in the Boonies" diorama which depicted the crew of C14 of C Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry (Mechanized), 9th Infantry Division as they were in July 1967 of which he was a member. This figure represents a Soldier from 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division and is equipped in a manner that was described to me for the 1967 time period.

Since I strive to be as accurate as I can be, for future projects I need to know what you meant by the towel being the wrong color.
The towel is a shade of OD Green, so how is that the wrong color? I have several towels from that period and no two are the exact same color OD Green. There are variances in color dyes from manufacturer to manufacturer so perhaps the towels Soldiers in your unit were issued may have been a slightly different shade that those issued at a different time and place to a different unit.

To prevent confusion for those who are reading this thread who may not know much about Vietnam or the development of the M16 and it's improvements over time, M16s with the forward assist did exist in-country prior to Tet. Not all units had them at that time depending on when the unit first arrived in Vietnam and their fielding priority. My dad arrived in Vietnam on 19 December 1966 as one of the advance party elements of the 9th Infantry Division and he had an M16 with a forward assist as did everyone else in the Division that was issued an M16. They had the three-prong flash hider like the one in the vignette. Since the 9th Infantry Division was formed and trained especially for service in Vietnam (Infantry Soldiers received their basic training and advanced individual training there at Fort Riley with the units they would serve in when they went to Vietnam), they were issued the latest Infantry weapons at that point in time which included the M16 with forward assist and three prong flash hider, M16s with the M148 grenade launcher attached in addition to M79s, M60s, etc. You must be thinking of the M16A1 with the birdcage flash hider and other improvements that wasn't issued until the 1968 Tet time period. Even though that version came out at that time, depending on the fielding priority of a unit, a unit may still be equipped with earlier versions until there were enough of the new ones issued to that unit.

You made a good point about the ammo load out for Infantrymen.
This Soldier is carrying at least 21 magazines for his M16 between the 8 in the ammo pouches and what he can fit in the claymore bag on his left side (as a Recon Marine in the late 1980's to mid 1990's I carried spare 30 round magazines in a claymore bag on missions in addition to what I carried on my LBE and I was able to carry 12 magazines in the bag. You can fit even more 20 round magazines in one.) The only thing he might be lacking would be belts of ammo for the M60, but those could have already been passed over to the M60 gunner (the person I talked to prior to this project told me that he rarely carried extra belts for the M60 since he was a point man most of the time. The figure is equipped like he described how he was equipped on a longer operation). Being that the places where the frags were attached to his ammo pouches are empty and the straps that secure the grenades are hanging down, he probably threw a few grenades already, so it is plausible that he would no longer have the belts if he was even carrying any. Different units have different SOPs and load outs depending on what their resupply situation might be and the size of the element. I know that short duration patrols of some elements of the 9th Infantry Division wore minimal gear especially when operating in the Delta region. Some 1st Cavalry Division units would patrol during the day without rucksacks because their unit would have them air delivered with the evening resupply. Due to these variances, it is important to know what unit one is depicting and to learn more about how that unit operated during the time period being depicted.

Thanks for bringing up those points so further clarification could be made as to why I equipped this figure as I did. Usually when I post my work on Armorama I include a background concerning what is going on in the diorama and why, info about the unit being depicted, notes about equipment, and stuff like that. I am the type of modeler who mainly models things that actually happened and include the actual Soldiers or Marines who were part of those actions when I can. I have done extensive research on units, Veteran experiences, various actions, uniforms and equipment, and weaponry as a historian and museum guy. When planning and making exhibits, one has to do quite a bit of research to make sure what is being displayed is as accurate as possible. Normally, I also run things by people who were involved in the event I am depicting prior to posting a completed work. I did do my normal inquiries and research at the beginning of the project before things were made. Things have been pretty busy for me lately and I had been trying to hurry to get this completed for an upcoming show, so this time I did not email in progress photos of the project like I normally do for feedback which is why the brightness of the color of the uncovered canteens wasn't addressed until this thread posted. My eyes aren't quite they used to be and I sometimes need those extra sets of eyes for things like that. I guess I better go on over to the other thread and update that part.

Cheers,
James
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 04:27 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Yep,the new color looks spot on to me now. This is a great piece as always!
J



Thanks for catching that, Jerry. My eyes aren't what they used to be. Although I was thinking that they were a bit bright myself, I was also thinking that I had the correct color mix that I usually use and thought my eyes might be playing tricks on me. I guess they weren't.

Cheers,
James
mariointer
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 04:50 AM GMT+7
Hi James, first of all i give you my congratuņations for this figure indeed.....i am waiting for your new work for a while , after that i saw your last diorama breakfast to the boonist...!!! This figure is incredible for the way you Painted it...really fantastic, in particular for the uniform color choice...what did you use??? Then when i saw your work , i enjoy myself to recognize the part from various brand you used,this time Bravo6 , the arms are of 35039, the body and haversack of 35050 (Ithaca man,,) and the legs of macv sog of 35043.....isnt it??? Fantastic is the way in which you try to fix the various part of difference source and create a single figure that is similar to a commercial figure...incredible you have a big caopacity to work with putty and green stuff....!!! A question the claymore bag (that appear in various your figures was commercila or you sculpted it???? And the sling of which material is????
In the past you speak me of a big project of an ambush of us soldiers from cong and rvn......have you stopped with this project?? Looking to these new Bravo6 figure ,057 and 058...i thought to realize a diorama on HAMBURGER HILL,now you that are so clever in nam figures trasformations have never had the same ideas????

There is the possibility tjat you show us same pictures of worjking progress of this figure????

PS. i saw your other figure with a part of m113 near him...fine insdeed in particular the way you try to resculpt on naked body trouser part...!!!!

Congratulations i hope to see again more of your masterpieces|||

Mario from Italy.
strongarden
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 05:54 AM GMT+7
Awesome. Your rendering of the terrain after the airstrike is right on the mark, no pun intended Learned a lot from the comments too, thanks!

Cheers
Dave
Blaubar
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 06:13 AM GMT+7
Simply amazing. All the history info comes a treat, there is nothing better than a diorama or blog with extensive research and brains involved! I bow to you sir.
/Stefan
trickymissfit
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Posted: Sunday, May 21, 2017 - 10:55 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text



The towel is a nice touch, but also the wrong color. Virtually every one used was O.D. green. M16 is a forward assist version. They didn't show up till Tet in 68, Also you didn't go a hundred feet past the wire without a combat load out. (21 mags and at least two belts) Still a nice piece of work.

gary



Thanks for your feedback, Gary. It is much appreciated and you can't beat getting info from those who were there. Thanks for your service. Prior to embarking on about 95% of my projects I talk to Veterans of the unit I am portraying who were involved in the events depicted in the project. Because of the wide range and differences of one's experiences in Vietnam depending on time frame, area of the country, and unit, I feel it is important so I can try to get as many of the smaller details correct in order to honor their service. Most of my work has depicted 9th Infantry Division units since that is the unit my father served in while in Vietnam and I have the most access to many Veterans from various 9th Infantry Division units who have helped me with details such as Bill Rambow helping me with the details for my "Breakfast in the Boonies" diorama which depicted the crew of C14 of C Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry (Mechanized), 9th Infantry Division as they were in July 1967 of which he was a member. This figure represents a Soldier from 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division and is equipped in a manner that was described to me for the 1967 time period.

Since I strive to be as accurate as I can be, for future projects I need to know what you meant by the towel being the wrong color.
The towel is a shade of OD Green, so how is that the wrong color? I have several towels from that period and no two are the exact same color OD Green. There are variances in color dyes from manufacturer to manufacturer so perhaps the towels Soldiers in your unit were issued may have been a slightly different shade that those issued at a different time and place to a different unit.

To prevent confusion for those who are reading this thread who may not know much about Vietnam or the development of the M16 and it's improvements over time, M16s with the forward assist did exist in-country prior to Tet. Not all units had them at that time depending on when the unit first arrived in Vietnam and their fielding priority. My dad arrived in Vietnam on 19 December 1966 as one of the advance party elements of the 9th Infantry Division and he had an M16 with a forward assist as did everyone else in the Division that was issued an M16. They had the three-prong flash hider like the one in the vignette. Since the 9th Infantry Division was formed and trained especially for service in Vietnam (Infantry Soldiers received their basic training and advanced individual training there at Fort Riley with the units they would serve in when they went to Vietnam), they were issued the latest Infantry weapons at that point in time which included the M16 with forward assist and three prong flash hider, M16s with the M148 grenade launcher attached in addition to M79s, M60s, etc. You must be thinking of the M16A1 with the birdcage flash hider and other improvements that wasn't issued until the 1968 Tet time period. Even though that version came out at that time, depending on the fielding priority of a unit, a unit may still be equipped with earlier versions until there were enough of the new ones issued to that unit.

You made a good point about the ammo load out for Infantrymen.
This Soldier is carrying at least 21 magazines for his M16 between the 8 in the ammo pouches and what he can fit in the claymore bag on his left side (as a Recon Marine in the late 1980's to mid 1990's I carried spare 30 round magazines in a claymore bag on missions in addition to what I carried on my LBE and I was able to carry 12 magazines in the bag. You can fit even more 20 round magazines in one.) The only thing he might be lacking would be belts of ammo for the M60, but those could have already been passed over to the M60 gunner (the person I talked to prior to this project told me that he rarely carried extra belts for the M60 since he was a point man most of the time. The figure is equipped like he described how he was equipped on a longer operation). Being that the places where the frags were attached to his ammo pouches are empty and the straps that secure the grenades are hanging down, he probably threw a few grenades already, so it is plausible that he would no longer have the belts if he was even carrying any. Different units have different SOPs and load outs depending on what their resupply situation might be and the size of the element. I know that short duration patrols of some elements of the 9th Infantry Division wore minimal gear especially when operating in the Delta region. Some 1st Cavalry Division units would patrol during the day without rucksacks because their unit would have them air delivered with the evening resupply. Due to these variances, it is important to know what unit one is depicting and to learn more about how that unit operated during the time period being depicted.

Thanks for bringing up those points so further clarification could be made as to why I equipped this figure as I did. Usually when I post my work on Armorama I include a background concerning what is going on in the diorama and why, info about the unit being depicted, notes about equipment, and stuff like that. I am the type of modeler who mainly models things that actually happened and include the actual Soldiers or Marines who were part of those actions when I can. I have done extensive research on units, Veteran experiences, various actions, uniforms and equipment, and weaponry as a historian and museum guy. When planning and making exhibits, one has to do quite a bit of research to make sure what is being displayed is as accurate as possible. Normally, I also run things by people who were involved in the event I am depicting prior to posting a completed work. I did do my normal inquiries and research at the beginning of the project before things were made. Things have been pretty busy for me lately and I had been trying to hurry to get this completed for an upcoming show, so this time I did not email in progress photos of the project like I normally do for feedback which is why the brightness of the color of the uncovered canteens wasn't addressed until this thread posted. My eyes aren't quite they used to be and I sometimes need those extra sets of eyes for things like that. I guess I better go on over to the other thread and update that part.

Cheers,
James



For some odd reason the issue O.D. towels didn't fade much at all. Kinda strange, but true. BUT! One could also take it that it was a towel that his Mom sent over in a care package. I used what was left of a raggedy old tee shirt, but I also had exactly one towel in my possession.

The forward assist is petty (in my eyes), and all you need to do is change the date and add a bird cage suppressor. My eyes are not good enough to tell what kind you used. The color of the stock was as close to perfect as you could get (few get that right, and the Parkerized finish just comes out period correct.

Most units had a standard set of orders for when you crossed the wire. The load out was flexable, but you never left with out at least one bandolier hanging on your neck. I've seen a couple ambushes tripped less than a hundred fifty yards outside the wire. After two or three months you didn't chance anything. Now the thing about two belts (or more) hanging around your neck is another S.O.P. thing. Yet if there was no sixty out there you wouldn't need one belt. Still trust me if you were a member of a squad moving out two hundred yards from the wire or even a CAV troop, you'd have a hog with you. Better to be tired than caught with out it.

I know little about the 9th Infantry to tell the truth, but know a little about Tet and the Bien Hoa area. Most was on the outside of the base. Pretty ugly. A good read on the area just outside is Dwight Birdwell's Hundred Miles Of Bad Road. My best friend (and former brother inlaw) was in the Quarter Cav right there as well, and he pretty much confirms what Dwight says. Yet Larry spent most of that time in the Rubber Plantations (now there's a place you need to investigate).

Your dio's are a work of art, but at times give me the creeps to be honest. The other lone figure reminds me of a certain sargent first class in the way he looks. You got him way too right, and I miss him.
gary
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Monday, May 22, 2017 - 02:52 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text



For some odd reason the issue O.D. towels didn't fade much at all. Kinda strange, but true. BUT! One could also take it that it was a towel that his Mom sent over in a care package. I used what was left of a raggedy old tee shirt, but I also had exactly one towel in my possession.

The forward assist is petty (in my eyes), and all you need to do is change the date and add a bird cage suppressor. My eyes are not good enough to tell what kind you used. The color of the stock was as close to perfect as you could get (few get that right, and the Parkerized finish just comes out period correct.

Most units had a standard set of orders for when you crossed the wire. The load out was flexable, but you never left with out at least one bandolier hanging on your neck. I've seen a couple ambushes tripped less than a hundred fifty yards outside the wire. After two or three months you didn't chance anything. Now the thing about two belts (or more) hanging around your neck is another S.O.P. thing. Yet if there was no sixty out there you wouldn't need one belt. Still trust me if you were a member of a squad moving out two hundred yards from the wire or even a CAV troop, you'd have a hog with you. Better to be tired than caught with out it.

I know little about the 9th Infantry to tell the truth, but know a little about Tet and the Bien Hoa area. Most was on the outside of the base. Pretty ugly. A good read on the area just outside is Dwight Birdwell's Hundred Miles Of Bad Road. My best friend (and former brother inlaw) was in the Quarter Cav right there as well, and he pretty much confirms what Dwight says. Yet Larry spent most of that time in the Rubber Plantations (now there's a place you need to investigate).

Your dio's are a work of art, but at times give me the creeps to be honest. The other lone figure reminds me of a certain sargent first class in the way he looks. You got him way too right, and I miss him.
gary



Hey Gary,

Thanks for the book recommendation. It is one of a few that I have not read yet. My friend Bill Rambow wrote two books, "CIB" and "ROE" which are historical fiction but were based on his experiences in Vietnam with 2/47th Inf (Mech). His company commander, John Gross, also wrote two books - one non-fiction and one historical fiction which were both quite helpful in gaining a perspective of what life was like in C Co, 2/47th Inf (Mech) in 1967 and during Tet of 68.

I appreciate your sharing of your memories about what it was like for you in Vietnam. It helps those who were not there gain a better understanding (although one will never gain a full understanding unless if they were there) of the things you guys experienced. For me, talking about my wartime experiences is helpful for me to understand what I went through. You mentioned that some of my work gives you the creeps sometimes. I'm sorry if it conjures up some bad memories, or perhaps good ones that remind you of the loss of those your cared about such as the SFC that you said the figure in my "Battle Weary Grunt" vignette reminds you of. I try to make my dioramas and figures as realistic as possible as a way to honor those who served and meant so much to their comrades and families. Again, thanks for your service and thank you for sharing your experiences. You and your Sergeant First Class will be in my thoughts and prayers.

Cheers,
James
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Monday, May 22, 2017 - 03:07 AM GMT+7
Thanks, Steve and Stefan. I am glad you like this piece.

Mario,
I'm glad you like the figure. I know it has been a while since I've completed some figures, vignettes, or dioramas. I thought being retired was going to mean that I would have more time for modeling, but it seems that I am more busy with non-modeling things around the house and land than I was when I was in the military. In reality, I had more responsibilities and had more to do in the military but it was what I was familiar with and it seemed easier to me.

The uniform colors are a mixture of Reaper Black Green for most of the shadows, Andrea Olive Green for the base color, highlights are the base color with Vallejo Sunny Skin tone mixed in. The darkest shadows and outlining is done with Andrea Black. I then used MIG pigments to dirty up the knees, butt, and elbows. You are correct about the Bravo 6 figure parts that I used for this figure conversion. The claymore bag on this particular figure is one from Bravo 6 that I cut off of the SEAL figure that is leading away the VC prisoner. The strap is made of lead foil. Sometimes I will sculpt my own claymore bags like I did on the "Battle Weary Grunt" figure. Since I did not think I could make the claymore bag on the "Frag Out!" figure to look exactly like Vladimir's style that would be evident on the bag attached to the rucksack frame, I figured that I had better use one from Bravo 6 so they would match in looks.

That Ambush diorama that you speak of has been put on hold and may be changing quite a bit. I have used the some of the figures I had originally made for that diorama on other projects. My main focus for a diorama now is one for the 50th Anniversary of the 1968 Tet Offensive.

Cheers,
James
mariointer
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Posted: Monday, May 22, 2017 - 04:36 AM GMT+7
Hi James, thanks a lot for your answer, could you remember me in which way you usually realized the boots so consumed....??

Thanks a gain.

Mario.
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:06 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Hi James, thanks a lot for your answer, could you remember me in which way you usually realized the boots so consumed....??

Thanks a gain.

Mario.



Hello, Mario.

After painting the leather portions of the jungle boots black, I mix in some Vallejo Sunny Skintone into the black to do the highlights. After that, I will use sunny skintone in very light coats to the areas where rocks and the terrain would cause scuffing of the boots. Hope that helps.

Cheers,
James
trickymissfit
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Posted: Monday, May 22, 2017 - 03:41 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text



For some odd reason the issue O.D. towels didn't fade much at all. Kinda strange, but true. BUT! One could also take it that it was a towel that his Mom sent over in a care package. I used what was left of a raggedy old tee shirt, but I also had exactly one towel in my possession.

The forward assist is petty (in my eyes), and all you need to do is change the date and add a bird cage suppressor. My eyes are not good enough to tell what kind you used. The color of the stock was as close to perfect as you could get (few get that right, and the Parkerized finish just comes out period correct.

Most units had a standard set of orders for when you crossed the wire. The load out was flexable, but you never left with out at least one bandolier hanging on your neck. I've seen a couple ambushes tripped less than a hundred fifty yards outside the wire. After two or three months you didn't chance anything. Now the thing about two belts (or more) hanging around your neck is another S.O.P. thing. Yet if there was no sixty out there you wouldn't need one belt. Still trust me if you were a member of a squad moving out two hundred yards from the wire or even a CAV troop, you'd have a hog with you. Better to be tired than caught with out it.

I know little about the 9th Infantry to tell the truth, but know a little about Tet and the Bien Hoa area. Most was on the outside of the base. Pretty ugly. A good read on the area just outside is Dwight Birdwell's Hundred Miles Of Bad Road. My best friend (and former brother inlaw) was in the Quarter Cav right there as well, and he pretty much confirms what Dwight says. Yet Larry spent most of that time in the Rubber Plantations (now there's a place you need to investigate).

Your dio's are a work of art, but at times give me the creeps to be honest. The other lone figure reminds me of a certain sargent first class in the way he looks. You got him way too right, and I miss him.
gary



Hey Gary,

Thanks for the book recommendation. It is one of a few that I have not read yet. My friend Bill Rambow wrote two books, "CIB" and "ROE" which are historical fiction but were based on his experiences in Vietnam with 2/47th Inf (Mech). His company commander, John Gross, also wrote two books - one non-fiction and one historical fiction which were both quite helpful in gaining a perspective of what life was like in C Co, 2/47th Inf (Mech) in 1967 and during Tet of 68.

I appreciate your sharing of your memories about what it was like for you in Vietnam. It helps those who were not there gain a better understanding (although one will never gain a full understanding unless if they were there) of the things you guys experienced. For me, talking about my wartime experiences is helpful for me to understand what I went through. You mentioned that some of my work gives you the creeps sometimes. I'm sorry if it conjures up some bad memories, or perhaps good ones that remind you of the loss of those your cared about such as the SFC that you said the figure in my "Battle Weary Grunt" vignette reminds you of. I try to make my dioramas and figures as realistic as possible as a way to honor those who served and meant so much to their comrades and families. Again, thanks for your service and thank you for sharing your experiences. You and your Sergeant First Class will be in my thoughts and prayers.

Cheers,
James



I think you read me wrong about SFC Oliver. I'd bet the farm he walked outta there. Know for a fact he did four tours. If he didn't, I'd hate to have gone down with him. Interestingly, your dioramas are in his A.O for his second and third tours. His first was with the 173rd near Dak To. His fourth was down south as he came in thru Bien Hoa.

Oliver was actually a WWII Ranger, and I think he had four or five combat jumps. He was seventeen when he went up the ladders in Normandy. He was first wave and either the first or second man that made it to the top. He wasn't sure, and remembers looking to his right and seeing another guy about a hundred yards away. He said he felt OK then! Always thought he should have wrote a book, but he didn't. Yet there were several magazine articles written about him. He did combat tours all over the place, and in some places we never talk about. Wore a max award CIB, and could have had at least two more stars on it. One thing odd was that he wore his Pathfinders tab above his Ranger tab, and was very proud of his glider patch. His hobby was bar room brawls!
gary
ReconTL3-1
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Posted: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 11:02 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text



I think you read me wrong about SFC Oliver. I'd bet the farm he walked outta there. Know for a fact he did four tours. If he didn't, I'd hate to have gone down with him. Interestingly, your dioramas are in his A.O for his second and third tours. His first was with the 173rd near Dak To. His fourth was down south as he came in thru Bien Hoa.

Oliver was actually a WWII Ranger, and I think he had four or five combat jumps. He was seventeen when he went up the ladders in Normandy. He was first wave and either the first or second man that made it to the top. He wasn't sure, and remembers looking to his right and seeing another guy about a hundred yards away. He said he felt OK then! Always thought he should have wrote a book, but he didn't. Yet there were several magazine articles written about him. He did combat tours all over the place, and in some places we never talk about. Wore a max award CIB, and could have had at least two more stars on it. One thing odd was that he wore his Pathfinders tab above his Ranger tab, and was very proud of his glider patch. His hobby was bar room brawls!
gary



Gary,
Yeah, I did read you wrong concerning SFC Oliver. I was thinking that you found the image haunting because you may have been there when he got hit. After reading what you had to say about him, he probably did make it through because he sounds like one tough dude. NCO's like him are very rare these days.

Cheers,
James
mojo72
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Posted: Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 12:52 AM GMT+7
Amazing work James. Always been a big fan of your dios/ vignettes. Everything that I've seen so far have been inspirational. Keep up the good work mate

Muhammad
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Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 - 12:46 PM GMT+7
Thanks, Muhammad.

I am glad you like my work and find it inspiring. I am working on another vignette of some Marines at Hue City and will be posting that within the next week or so.

Cheers,
James